• 1 oz. Proof Silver American Eagles are a limited mintage coin from the United States Mint. With the same design as the Silver American Eagle bullion coins, Proof American Eagles are minted in 1-oz. increments. MINTING The design on the coin’s obverse was taken from the “Walking Liberty” design by Adolph A. Weinman, which originally had been used on the Walking Liberty Half Dollar coin of the United States from 1916 to 1947. As this iconic design had been a public favorite—and one of the most beloved designs of any United States coinage of modern times, silver or otherwise—it was revived for the Silver Eagle decades later. The obverse is inscribed with the year of minting or issuance, the word LIBERTY, and the phrase IN GOD WE TRUST. Proof Silver American Eagle coins are made with a more-detailed minting process. Special dies are used on the coin blanks, which are fed manually into the presses and struck multiple times to produce detailed coin images that look softly frosted above a mirror-like background. Each proof American Eagle comes in a beautiful, dark blue velvet presentation case with an official United States Mint Certificate of Authority. Due to their limited quantity, Proof Eagles trade not only off of spot price, but also supply and demand as Proof Eagles typically sell out each year.
  • The Silver American Eagle is the official silver bullion coin of the United States and one of the best selling bullion assets available in silver. It was first released by the United States Mint on November 24, 1986. It is struck only in the one-troy ounce size, which has a nominal face value of one dollar and is guaranteed to contain one troy ounce of 99.9% pure silver. MINTING The design on the coin’s obverse was taken from the “Walking Liberty” design by Adolph A. Weinman, which originally had been used on the Walking Liberty Half Dollar coin of the United States from 1916 to 1947. As this iconic design had been a public favorite—and one of the most beloved designs of any United States coinage of modern times, silver or otherwise—it was revived for the Silver Eagle decades later. The obverse is inscribed with the year of minting or issuance, the word LIBERTY, and the phrase IN GOD WE TRUST. Silver American Eagles are an unhedged asset, meaning they are minted in unlimited quantity to meet market demand.
  • The America the Beautiful Silver Coins comprise a series of silver bullion coins with a face value of a quarter dollar. The coins contain five troy ounces of silver, making them the largest silver bullion coins ever issued by the United States Mint.   The design of the coins duplicates exactly—though enlarged—each of the America the Beautiful Quarters. They have been issued since 2010 and will continue to be issued until at least 2021.

    A new coining press from Germany was installed on March 1, 2010, at the Philadelphia Mint for use in producing the America the Beautiful Silver Bullion Coins. The press provides up to 1,000 metric tons (1,100 short tons) of pressure for each strike and can produce in excess of 1 million coins per year.  America the Beautiful Silver Coins are a hedged asset, meaning they are minted in limited quantities each year.

  • In decades past, junk silver coins — which contain 90% silver — served as legal tender for everyday necessities like food and clothing. These days, people purchase junk silver for both investment and survival purposes. While junk silver coins do not contain an even amount of bullion (like 1-oz American Silver Eagles) they possess qualities that sometimes make them preferable to bullion coins. Note: It is called junk silver when a coin’s value is based solely on its metal content. This is different from scrap silver. 90% Silver U.S. Coins were the basis for our currency for hundreds of years until 1965, when the price of Silver started increasing more drastically, and the U.S. government replaced it with a coin made of a copper-nickel mixture known as cupronickel. Shortly thereafter, the American public started hoarding the older U.S. Silver coins. Since then, these original Silver coins have become scarcer and more desirable.
  • The Morgan dollar was a United States dollar coin minted from 1878 to 1904, and then again in 1921. It was the first standard silver dollar minted since production of the previous design, the Seated Liberty dollar, ceased due to the passage of the Coinage Act of 1873, which also ended the free coining of silver. The coin is named after its designer, United States Mint Assistant Engraver George T. Morgan. The obverse depicts a profile portrait representing Liberty, while the reverse depicts an eagle with wings outstretched. MINTING In 1898, Congress approved a bill that required all remaining bullion purchased under the Sherman Silver Purchase Act to be coined into silver dollars. When those silver reserves were depleted in 1904, the Mint ceased to strike the Morgan dollar. The Pittman Act, passed in 1918, authorized the melting and recoining of millions of silver dollars. Pursuant to the act, Morgan dollars resumed mintage for one year in 1921. The design was replaced by the Peace dollar later the same year. 1921 Morgans were minted in much lower numbers as they were only produced one year, and given that they were minted more recently tend to be in better shape. For these reasons, 1921 Morgan Dollars carry a higher premium.
  • The Peace dollar is a United States dollar coin minted from 1921 to 1928, and again in 1934 and 1935. Early proposals for the coin called for a commemorative issue to coincide with the end of World War I, but the Peace Dollar was issued as a circulating coin. Designed by Anthony de Francisci, the coin was the result of a competition to find designs emblematic of peace. Its obverse represents the head and neck of the Goddess of Liberty in profile, and the reverse depicts a bald eagle at rest clutching an olive branch, with the legend “Peace”. It was the last United States dollar coin to be struck for circulation in silver. All coins in VG or better condition with dates and mint marks are our choice based on availability. MINTING The Peace Dollar was the successor to the Morgan Dollar, which had not been regularly minted since 1904. With the passage of the Pittman Act in 1918, the mintage of dollar coins was enabled to start again. Prior to the design and acceptance of the Peace Dollar, the Morgan Dollar was minted again in 1921. The Peace dollar was first struck on December 28, 1921; just over a million were coined bearing a 1921 date. When the Pittman Act requirements were met in 1928, the mint ceased to strike the coins, but more were struck in 1934 and 1935 as a result of other legislation. In 1965, the mint struck over 300,000 Peace dollars bearing a 1964 date, but these were never issued, and all are believed to have been melted.
  • The 1 oz. Silver Canadian Maple Leaf is one of the best selling bullion assets due mainly to the sterling reputation of the Royal Canadian Mint and the coins 99.99% purity. Silver Canadian Maples Leafs are guaranteed by the Canadian government (purity, weight and legal tender value) making them a popular option for investors interested in harnessing the value of bullion. MINTING The Silver Maple Leaf’s obverse and reverse display, respectively, the profile of Queen Elizabeth II of Canada and the Canadian Maple Leaf. In 2013 and 2015 new security features were introduced. In 2013 a micro-engraved textured maple leaf (with laser technology), on a small area of the reverse (Maple Leaf) side of the coin. In the center of this mark is the numeral denoting the coin’s year of issue, which is only visible under magnification. In 2015 the radial lines on the coin’s background on both sides of the coin. Silver Canadian Maple Leafs are an unhedged asset, meaning they are minted in unlimited quantity to meet market demand.
  • The 1 oz. Silver Austrian Philharmonic is one of the most popular silver bullion coins in the world. With its .9999 fine silver content and classic Musikverein design featuring traditional instruments the Philharmonic is a top choice for bullion investors. The obverse of the coin features The Great Organ of the Golden Hall in Vienna’s concert hall, the Musikverein, along with the year, weight and face value. The reverse showcases an array of instruments, including the cello, violin, harp, Vienna horn and bassoon. MINTING The Austrian Silver Philharmonic coins are produced at the Austrian Mint which is located in Vienna, Austria. The national Austrian Mint is well-known for its beautiful designs and innovative currency. In fact, it has been minting coins for over 800 years, making it one of the oldest government run minting institutions in the entire world. The Silver Austrian Philharmonic coin was designed as a commemoration of the Viennese Philharmonic orchestra which calls Austria its home. Silver Philharmonics are an unhedged asset, meaning they are minted in unlimited quantity to meet market demand.
  • 10 oz. Silver Bars, also commonly referred to as ingots, are privately minted silver assets that are typically purchased by investors in 1 oz., 10 oz., or 100 oz increments as they are easier to buy and sell in smaller denominations. Larger bars, up to 500 oz. are traded on COMEX and other major exchanges. MINTING Since silver bars are privately minted by a variety of companies such as Engelhard, Johnson Matthey and Credit Suisse among other, there are wide range of designs and mint marks. However, all reputable silver bars will have silver mass, purity and issuing company either on the reverse or obverse of the bar. Red Rock will not guarantee the producer of silver bars unless otherwise specified. Silver Bars are an unhedged asset, meaning they are minted in unlimited quantity to meet market demand.
  • 1 oz. Silver Rounds are privately minted silver assets that are typically purchased by investors in 1 oz. increments as they are easier to buy and sell in smaller denominations. Silver rounds are a less well-known variation of silver bars. The difference between rounds and bars is found almost exclusively in the weights that are available. You will be able to find many bars that weigh 5 oz or 10 oz or more. Like coins, rounds are usually produced only in 1 oz and smaller varieties. Where bars offer the ability for investors to order bulk quantities at a time, rounds also allow for smaller quantities to be ordered and afford the ability to use in smaller quantities. They look similar to a silver coin in design and shape but unlike coins, rounds are produced by private mints and not governments. Rounds are often seen as commemorative releases, but many are also minted with nothing more than the brand of the mint on either side of the silver. MINTING Since silver rounds are privately minted by a variety of companies such as Engelhard, Johnson Matthey and Sunshine Minting among others, there are wide range of designs and mint marks. However, all reputable silver rounds will have silver mass, purity and issuing company either on the reverse or obverse of the rounds. Red Rock will not guarantee the producer of silver rounds unless otherwise specified. Silver Rounds are an unhedged asset, meaning they are minted in unlimited quantity to meet market demand.